Second woman accuses U.S. Senator Franken of groping: CNN

Second woman accuses U.S. Senator Franken of groping: CNNA second woman has accused Democratic Senator Al Franken of inappropriately touching her, this time in 2010 after he had been elected to public office, CNN reported on Monday. Franken was first accused of sexual misconduct last week, when radio broadcaster and model Leann Tweeden said that, in 2006, he had forcibly kissed her and groped her while she was sleeping. At that time, Franken was a professional comedian.



In win for Trump, Nebraska approves Keystone XL pipeline route

In win for Trump, Nebraska approves Keystone XL pipeline routeBy Kevin O'Hanlon and Ethan Lou LINCOLN, Nebraska/CALGARY, Alberta (Reuters) - Nebraska regulators approved a route for TransCanada Corp's Keystone XL pipeline through the state on Monday, lifting the last big regulatory obstacle for the long-delayed project that U.S. President Donald Trump wants built. The 3-2 vote by the Nebraska Public Service Commission helps clear the way for the pipeline linking Canada's Alberta oil sands to refineries in the United States, but is likely to be tied up for years in court challenges by opponents who say the project is an environmental risk. "We are going to fight like hell to make sure this pipeline never gets built," said Jane Kleeb, the head of anti-pipeline Bold Nebraska, a political advocacy group.



Tyson puts Kansas plant on hold, to build facility in Tennessee

Tyson puts Kansas plant on hold, to build facility in TennesseeThe company will continue to consider potential sites in Kansas for additional expansion of its poultry business, spokesman Worth Sparkman told Reuters in an email on Monday. The proposed $320 million plant in Tonganoxie, Kansas was expected to create about 1,600 jobs. Tyson said the plant in Gibson County, Tennessee would create more than 1,500 local jobs once it begins operations in late 2019.



U.S. general sets two-year goal for driving back Afghan Taliban

U.S. general sets two-year goal for driving back Afghan TalibanBy Phil Stewart and Idrees Ali WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The top U.S. general in Afghanistan said on Monday he believes he could help Afghan forces drive back the Taliban enough to control at least 80 percent of the country within two years, compared with about two-thirds today. General John Nicholson, citing counter-insurgency doctrine, said gaining 80 percent control of the country would represent a turning point in the 16-year-old conflict, which has become the longest U.S war. "This we believe is the critical mass necessary to drive the enemy to irrelevance, meaning they're living in these remote outlying areas, or they reconcile, or they die," Nicholson told a Pentagon news briefing via video conference from Afghanistan.



Former New York state official sued over alleged sex harassment

Former New York state official sued over alleged sex harassmentLisa Cater, a former Department of Motor Vehicles employee, filed suit in Manhattan's federal court against William Hoyt, a former regional head of the state's economic development agency, as well as Cuomo, the agency and New York state. The lawsuit, filed on Saturday, contends that the Cuomo administration ignored repeated complaints by her against Hoyt, a married former state assemblyman.





Close Window