10 Things to Know for Tuesday

Workers of the German Red Cross (DRK) prepare a load of humanitarian aid for victims of the earthquake in Nepal, in front of an aircraft at Schoenefeld airport outside Berlin Monday, April 27, 2015. The flight will carry around 60 tonnes of supplies for the victims. (Hannibal Hanschke/Pool Photo via AP)Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about Tuesday:



AP PHOTOS: Riots hit Baltimore after Freddie Gray funeral

Firefighters prepare to put out a fire at a store, Monday, April 27, 2015, during unrest following the funeral of Freddie Gray in Baltimore. Gray died from spinal injuries about a week after he was arrested and transported in a Baltimore Police Department van. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)BALTIMORE (AP) — A CVS store set ablaze. People looting shops and hurling rocks and bricks at police. The smell of burned rubber in one neighborhood where youths looted a liquor store.



Baltimore erupts in riots after funeral of man who died in police custody

Demonstrators jump on a damaged Baltimore police department vehicle during clashes in BaltimoreBy Ian Simpson BALTIMORE (Reuters) - Baltimore erupted in violence on Monday as hundreds of rioters looted stores, burned buildings and injured at least 15 police officers following the funeral of a 25-year-old black man who died after he was injured in police custody. The riots broke out just a few blocks from the funeral of Freddie Gray and then spread through much of West Baltimore in the most violent U.S. demonstrations since arson and shooting in Ferguson, Missouri, last year. A large fire consumed a senior center under construction near a church in East Baltimore on Wednesday night, television reports showed, but it was not immediately clear if it was related to the riots. Maryland Governor Larry Hogan declared a state of emergency and activated the National Guard as firefighters battled blazes set by looters.



Angry Nepalis wait for quake help as death toll passes 4,000

By Rupam Jain Nair and Gopal Sharma KATHMANDU (Reuters) - Shock turned to anger in Nepal on Tuesday as some of the tens of thousands stricken by a devastating earthquake, which killed more than 4,000 people, expressed frustration at what they said was their government's slow response to the crisis. International aid has finally begun arriving in the Himalayan nation of 28 million people after the major quake that struck at about midday on Saturday. A Home Ministry official in the capital, Kathmandu, said the death toll from the 7.9 magnitude quake stood at 4,010, with 7,598 injured. Nepal's most deadly quake in 81 years triggered a huge avalanche on Mount Everest that killed at least 17 climbers and guides, including foreigners, the worst single disaster on the world's highest peak.
Latest on police-custody death: Massive fire related to riot

Mourners view the body of Freddie Gray before his funeral at New Shiloh Baptist Church, Monday, April 27, 2015, in Baltimore. Gray died from spinal injuries about a week after he was arrested and transported in a Baltimore Police Department van. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)9:30 p.m.





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