U.S. House passes border-security funding bill to speed deportations

Speaker of the House John Boehner (R-OH) walks from his office to the House Chamber during a procedural vote at the CapitolBy David Lawder and Richard Cowan WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Republicans in the U.S. House of Representatives voted on Friday to crack down on Central American migrants, including unaccompanied children, who are flooding to the U.S. border with Mexico, as lawmakers passed a $694 million border security bill. The 223-189 vote came one day after conservative Republicans balked at an earlier version of the measure, exposing a deep rift between Tea Party activists and more mainstream Republicans. In passing the retooled bill, the Republican-led House ignored a veto threat from the White House. "We couldn't go home (for recess) and not have a decision," said Representative Kay Granger of Texas, who helped draft the original bill.



Congress backs Israel's Iron Dome missile defense

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress approved a $225 million package to replenish Israel's missile defenses with its last order of business before a five-week recess, as the Jewish state's cease-fire with Hamas unraveled and Israeli forces pushed deep into Gaza in search of a missing army officer.
House OKs bill to address border crisis

President Barack Obama pauses as he speaks in the Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House in Washington, Friday, Aug. 1, 2014. The president spoke on various topics including the economy, immigration, Ukraine and the Middle East. (AP Photo/Connor Radnovich)WASHINGTON (AP) — House Republicans passed legislation late Friday to address the crisis on the U.S.-Mexico border by sending migrant youths back home without hearings, winning over conservatives with a companion bill that could lead to deporting more than half a million immigrants whom the Obama administration granted temporary work permits. President Barack Obama condemned the Republican action and said he'd act unilaterally, as best he could.



West Africa seeks to seal off Ebola-hit regions

West Africa's Ebola-hit nations have agreed to impose a cross-border isolation zone at the epicentre of the world's worst-ever outbreak, amid warnings that the deadly epidemic is spiralling out of control. The announcement came at an emergency summit in the Guinean capital on Friday to discuss the outbreak, which has killed more than 700 people, with the World Health Organization warning Ebola could cause "catastrophic" loss of life and severe economic disruption if it continued to spread. "We have agreed to take important and extraordinary actions at the inter-country level to focus on cross-border regions that have more than 70 percent of the epidemic," said Hadja Saran Darab, the secretary-general of the Mano River Union bloc grouping the nations. Opening the summit, WHO chief Margaret Chan told leaders that the response of the three countries to the epidemic had been "woefully inadequate", revealing that the outbreak was "moving faster than our efforts to control it".
Goodell defends NFL's 2-game suspension of Rice

El jugador de los Ravens, Ray Rice, habla en conferencia de prensa el jueves, 31 de julio de 2014, en Owings Mills, Maryland. (AP Photo/Gail Burton)CANTON, Ohio (AP) — NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell defended himself Friday against criticism that he was too lenient in suspending Ray Rice two games for his "horrible mistake."





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