Man who says he was cartel enforcer pleads guilty to murders

FILE - In an undated file photo, Jose Manuel Martinez arrives at the Lawrence County Judicial Building in Moulton, Ala., before pleading guilty to shooting Jose Ruiz in Lawrence County, Ala., in March 2013. Martinez who admitted to killing dozens of people across the United States as an enforcer for drug cartels in Mexico, will begin to hear evidence in court Tuesday, Oct. 6, that prosecutors say proves he gunned down nine people throughout Central California. Authorities say Martinez opened up to them after his arrest in 2013, detailing a long, violent career with over 30 victims. (John Godbey/The Decatur Daily via AP)VISALIA, Calif. (AP) — A man who says he was a cartel enforcer pleaded guilty Tuesday to nine counts of murder in California after acknowledging to investigators that he had committed killings across the country.

Judge tosses conviction in NYC tourist killing; man freed

Johnny Hincapie, center, hugs his father Carlos Hincapie, left, and mother Maria Hincapie as he leaves a court building, Tuesday, Oct. 6, 2015, in New York. Johnny Hincapie, imprisoned for a quarter-century in a notorious tourist killing, was granted a new trial and freed on Tuesday, after a judge overturned his conviction in a case that helped crystallize an era of crime and fear in the nation's biggest city. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)NEW YORK (AP) — After 25 years of trying to clear himself in a notorious tourist killing, Johnny Hincapie walked out of a courthouse Tuesday, his conviction overturned and his resolve intact.

U.N. chief 'shocked' by charges against ex-General Assembly president

U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon was shocked by allegations that John Ashe, a former president of the United Nations General Assembly, took more than $1.3 million in bribes, Ban's spokesman said on Tuesday. "The secretary-general was shocked and deeply troubled to learn this morning of the allegations against John Ashe, the former president of the General Assembly, which go to the heart of the integrity of the United Nations," Stephane Dujarric told reporters.
More charges possible in U.N. corruption case: U.S. Attorney

More people could face criminal charges as part of a corruption probe that has already led to the arrest of a former president of the United Nations General Assembly, Manhattan U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara said on Tuesday. John Ashe, a former U.N. ambassador from Antigua and Barbuda who was president in 2013, was accused on Tuesday of taking more than $1.3 million in bribes in a wide-ranging scheme that involved a billionaire Macau real estate developer and four other defendants.
Right-to-die backers say California helps fight elsewhere

FILE - In this Sept. 14, 2015, file photo, Calif. Gov. Jerry Brown discuss the state's wildfire situation at the Governor's Office of Emergency Services news conference in Rancho Cordova, Calif. Gov. Brown signed legislation, Monday, Oct. 5, 2015, allowing terminally ill people in the nation's most populous state to take their lives, saying the emotionally charged bill forced him to consider "what I would want in the face of my own death." Brown, a lifelong Catholic and former Jesuit seminarian, said he acted after discussing the issue with many people, including a Catholic bishop and two of his doctors. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, file)SAN DIEGO (AP) — It will soon be legal for the terminally ill to end their own lives in the nation's most populous state, and right-to-die advocates expect other states to follow California's example.

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